Premium Domain Names for Sale at CrocoDom.com
Domain Name Wire | Domain Name News
Domain Name Industry News
4 Comments
Patting yourself on the back can have adverse effects.
Earlier today, domain investor @tonynames posted a request to domainers on Twitter:
It is a humble request to the domaining community not share your purchase price. We already face a lot of Hate from potential end user community and it gives out the wrong message without understanding our total carry cost of a portfolio etc Just share the price, that is enough
 
Tony is referring to a common practice of domain investors: mentioning how much they bought a domain for and how much they sold it for.
The problem with this is twofold.
First, it gives ammunition to people who hate “squatters”. You charged me $4,000 for something you bought for $40?! That’s crazy!
Second, it ignores the reality of domain investing for most domainers.  The unit economics are spectacular, but the overall economics are tough because you only sell a small portion of your portfolio each year.
Consider this response from @domain_org:
 
Maybe share your carrying cost with every sale posted. Eg. $120k/year in acquisition and renewal fees and only $6k in sales this month. Out of pocket costs are more than what most people think. It's not profitable yet.
When someone tells me they sold $100,000 of domains last year, I often ask them what their carrying costs are. On top of that, how much did they spend on new acquisitions this year to keep the sales flowing? In other words, what’s their cash flow?
Anyone can build a portfolio that generates a lot of sales, but are they actually adding money to their bank account?
Join the conversation here.
 
Categories: Domain Sales
Stay up-to-date with the latest analysis and news about the domain name industry by joining our mailing list.
No spam, unsubscribe anytime.
J.R. says

Some see sharing acquisition costs publicly as beneficial, but I don’t.
Acquisition and holding costs are up across the board: hand regs, BINs, expired auctions and renewals, etc.
GD now has $22 renewals on dot Com; how long before it reaches $30? Hence a 1K portfolio was $10K renewals in 2015, $15K (2020) and $22K (2023).
Not small leaps in holding costs.
I doubt most domainers are adding real profits to their bank accounts.
Most are just breaking even YoY at best, if making any profits at all.
The illiquid nature of domaining is inescapable.
STR rates and average sell prices ($2,300) are ignored because too many see the DN Journal top 10.
Crypto & NFT peak of 2020 influenced many domainers habit of domain showcasing (unverified sales/blacked out) for attention.
Andrew Allemann says

Just to call out one thing here…if you have 1,000 domains at GoDaddy, you’re definitely not paying $22k each. You’re in the Domain Discount Club paying less than $10. BUT, that prices has increased about 7% a year along with Verisign’s increase. And your overall point is taken.
J.R. says

Even Domain Discount Club is an annual fee I’m not interested in paying.
Paying GD $250 annually, so they can charge you more than it costs to transfer the domain to another registrar?
I get it, those w/ 5K+ portfolios are mostly a captured consumer, but as long as I own less than 1K domains; transferring out is cheaper.
GD could eliminate a lot of their competition if their renewals were ALWAYS $9.99, but then they have to pay for those mergers & acquisitions, eh?
Anonymous says

“First, it gives ammunition to people who hate “squatters”. You charged me $4,000 for something you bought for $40?! That’s crazy!”
Those people fail to see the bigger picture in my opinion. Real example: “You paid $10 for a domain, charged me $3,500 but… the website I built on that domain has earned more than $75,000+. So $3,500 is a bargain when considering the potential use of a domain name. The bigger picture matters.
Domain Name Wire is a trade publication for the domain name industry covering topics relevant to domain investors, brand owners, policy makers, domain registrars and registries, and more. Read More About DNW
Stay up-to-date with the latest analysis and news about the domain name industry by joining our mailing list.
No spam, unsubscribe anytime.
© 2005–2022 Domain Name Wire · DNW and Domain Name Wire are trademarks of Brainstorm Labs, LLC

source
Premium Domain Names:

A premium domain name is a highly sought-after domain that is typically short, memorable, and contains popular keywords or phrases. These domain names are considered valuable due to their potential to attract more organic traffic and enhance branding efforts. Premium domain names are concise and usually consist of one to two words or two to four individual characters.

Top-Level Domain Names for Sale on Crocodom.com:

If you are looking for top-level domain names for sale, you can visit Crocodom.com. Crocodom.com is a platform that offers a selection of domain names at various price ranges. It is important to note that the availability of specific domain names may vary, and it’s recommended to check the website for the most up-to-date information.

Contact at crocodomcom@gmail.com:

If you have any inquiries or need assistance regarding the domain names available on Crocodom.com, you can reach out to them via email at crocodomcom@gmail.com. Feel free to contact them for any questions related to the domain names or the purchasing process.

Availability on Sedo.com, Dan.com, and Afternic.com:

Apart from Crocodom.com, you can also explore other platforms like Sedo.com, Dan.com, and Afternic.com for available domain names. These platforms are popular marketplaces for buying and selling domain names. Each platform may have its own inventory of domain names, so it’s worth checking multiple sources to find the perfect domain name for your needs.

#PremiumDomains #DomainInvesting #DigitalAssets #DomainMarketplace #DomainFlipping #BrandableDomains #DomainBrokers #DomainAcquisition #DomainPortfolio #DomainIndustry #DomainAuctions #DomainInvestors #DomainSales #DomainExperts #DomainValue #DomainBuyers #DomainNamesForSale #DomainBrand #DomainInvestment #DomainTrading

Leave a comment